Posts Tagged ‘ China ’

EM Stock Markets – Destabilized by Currency Sell-offs and Capital Outflows

September 26, 2011
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EM Stock Markets – Destabilized by Currency Sell-offs and Capital Outflows

Developed market equities are attempting to stabilize based on additional talks from Eurozone leaders who are meeting with the IMF and reported to be discussing items such as expanding the size of the EFSF, creating a TARP-EU, and recapitalizing more of the European financials. Developed market investors are attempting to look ahead during scary times. This contrasts to the overnight session in Asia, which saw another spiral into panic selling towards the Asian close. Most markets were down 3-6% again, and for a short period last night the S&P futures were down 15 points (2.5% lower than 8:00am NY time). There are a number of signs that this round of selling is liquidation with little regard to fundamentals in the region. The selling is indiscriminant when you look across...

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Nike’s Strong Results Indicative of Solid Global Consumption

September 23, 2011
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Nike’s Strong Results Indicative of Solid Global Consumption

Nike (NKE) reported an excellent set of results after the close last night. Headline earnings were $1.36 vs a street consensus of $1.21 (12.4% beat). I listened to the Nike earnings conference call and was really impressed with the strong business trends relative to the obvious dislocations we are seeing in the market and talk of global recession. Nike is one of the world’s strongest global brands and has a diversified business across both developed and emerging markets, across product categories such as footwear, apparel, and equipment, and across income demographics. If there was a global slowdown taking place right now it would be something that should impact Nike’s business. Basketball and running sneakers are mature categories in most countries. Nike’s earnings were driven by strong sales trends around...

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Chitaly Starts to Mambo Italiano – China in Talks To Buy Italian Sovereign Debt?

September 12, 2011
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Chitaly Starts to Mambo Italiano – China in Talks To Buy Italian Sovereign Debt?

I mentioned this possibility over a month ago on August 5th, in the story “Chitaly – China to Purchase Italian Sovereign Debt?” Headlines just hit that Italy is in talks with China to directly buy Italian bonds according to the FT. This headline caused an immediate lift to depressed markets which is quickly getting faded. I believe this may actually transpire because it accomplishes two aims. Most clearly, it helps Italy fund its sovereign debt, which they had some trouble doing today as evidenced by the 1-YR note auction going for 4.15% this month vs 2.96% last month. Secondarily, China is desperate to maintain the euro, because this is the only other major currency which has the potential to be investible for large quantities of FX reserves. To the extent that China runs a...

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It’s Time to Buy in Hong Kong

August 31, 2011
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It’s Time to Buy in Hong Kong

After a brutal correction in both prices and valuations it is time to get long(er) China geared Hong Kong listed equities. I believe the timing is right because the single largest risk factor, inflationary pressure, is in the process of peaking, and is likely to abate moving forward. China growth persists at a 9% clip and I believe this growth rate is likely to slow gradually. Through a combination of currency appreciation, higher real interest rates, and credit constraints (the growth rate of credit) China will start the gradual process of focusing on domestic demand. Valuation is on the side of real investors as the H-Shares (HSCEI index) are at ex-crisis lows and sub 10x forward earnings. This is a 30%-40% valuation discount to what is “average” over the...

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China Rate Hike Cycle Over?

August 11, 2011
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China Rate Hike Cycle Over?

Markets are on edge. This type of volatility is wrenching. It weighs on professional investors, it interjects more emotion into the investment process, while elevating stress, and causing people to lose sleep. The above is natural as money is made or lost at an outsized pace in hourly timeframes. This phenomena is measured by the VIX index which has surged to over 40 this week (was 15-25 the majority of the past couple of years). When you are stressed, tired, and emotional, you don’t think or research as clearly. Things get missed. There was some subtle news in the past week about August 10th being a key date for the People’s Bank of China with respect to making a decision on rate hikes. Stories were out last week from Xinhua...

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China Inflation – Non-News News

August 8, 2011
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China Inflation – Non-News News

The Chinese CPI is not an apples-to-apples measure relative to the CPI (consumer price index) that is reported here in the US. Some are attributing the overnight leg-down in the S&P futures (down another 24 or 2.25% at 11:00pm) to the fact that Chinese inflation came in at 6.5% when the consensus was 6.4%. Crackerjack says: “bullocks”. This is just some more good old fashion market panic in our opinion. Chinese food inflation came in at +14.8%. Certainly high, but food inflation is much more volatile and both weather, crop, and commodity price dependent (notice how all commodities except for gold have been collapsing the past few days). Chinese inflation ex-food is running up 2.9%. Not too much different than inflation in the US, nor should it be with...

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Chitaly – China to purchase Italian Sovereign Debt?

August 5, 2011
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Chitaly – China to purchase Italian Sovereign Debt?

Crackerjack continues to hold the view, that what transpired in the markets is a crisis of confidence, more so than an actual crisis. There is a big and important difference. During the real-deal 2008-2009 economic crisis you had actual insolvent institutions as the value of mortgage securities declined when the US housing market imploded. The sovereign debt crisis in Europe is also a real crisis as it relates to Greece, Portugal, and Ireland (these countries can never pay back what they borrowed) but these economies aren’t big enough to tip the world into a global recession. While Spain and Italy have numerous longer-term structural issues which need to be addressed, these nations have ample ability to pay their actual agreed upon debts so long as the interest costs are manageable. Italian...

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