Posts Tagged ‘ quantitative easing ’

Valuing the Yellen Put

April 7, 2016
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Valuing the Yellen Put

The Yellen Put, follows a line of Federal Reserve inspired put options, valuable to market participants of specific Fed Chair eras. The rationale behind the Fed Chair put is simple; with the Federal Reserve so vigilant to support any downtick in the economy and/or markets with interest rate cuts (Greenspan), quantitative easing (Bernanke), and ZIRF (Zero Interest Rates Forever – Yellen) investors receive downside protection from the Fed. Actually paying for downside protection vis-a-vis real put options takes on a ludicrous feel; markets don’t go down much, and if they do, they never stay down. Duh. That markets are increasingly policy driven is a reality of the current investment/economic cycle. 2016 investors are learning (through force) just how valuable the Yellen Put is. Janet Yellen is the most dovish...

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Super Dovish Fed Persists

September 18, 2015
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Super Dovish Fed Persists

The Fed’s lack of policy response, and subsequent press conference, evokes memories of a scene in Bronx Tale… What’s going on here?  Now you can’t leave.  I will never forget the look on their faces.  All eight of them.Their faces dropped.  All their courage and strength was drained from their bodies.  They had a reputation for breaking up bars.  But they knew that instant they made a fatal mistake.  This time, they walked into the wrong bar. An opportunity for the Yellen Fed to exit ZIRP came and passed yesterday. Possibly, it will be more convenient to start a rate hike cycle in October/December or possibly, in 2016. But if China enters a recession, and financial markets remain stressed, it is also possible that the Fed will be unable to raise rates during the...

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Like QE, the ECB’s Long-Term Refinancing Operations Will Continue for Years

April 23, 2012
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Like QE, the ECB’s Long-Term Refinancing Operations Will Continue for Years

I came across an article in The Telegraph by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard which does a good job highlighting the circularity of the ECB’s LTRO and associated bond buying. As banks throughout Europe took advantage of ECB stimulus, which they were de facto encouraged to do by Mario Draghi and the ECB, it is clear that both the stimulus itself, as well as ECB sovereign debt purchases, will be needed until there is a solid economic recovery throughout the periphery of Europe. With austerity implementation to reduce deficits, economic recovery for many counties in Europe could be years away. With the automatic stabilization mechanisms in peripheral Europe broken as weaker economic growth leads to higher interest rates it will become necessary for Europe to continue to cap interest rates to avoid...

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