Posts Tagged ‘ China ’

Nike Bone Crusher; China’s Economy isn’t Collapsing

September 25, 2015
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Nike Bone Crusher; China’s Economy isn’t Collapsing

Maybe the economy in China isn’t collapsing. Nike reported a bone crusher of a quarterly report last night; a stark wake-up call for China bears. Nike management credibility is higher than that of the Chinese government, and this earnings report, at this juncture, is stunningly good. Nike segment reports its future orders by geography, adjusted for currency movement, and the results out of China are the strongest since 2012. Nike is surging in China again. Impressive because China isn’t a new market; Nike is entrenched, and has invested, and developed the brand in China for a solid 15 years. The 27% china orders growth accelerated relative to last quarter’s 22% growth. The acceleration took place despite the China A-shares collapse, the renminbi devaluation, and lots of negative press on...

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China in Recession; Yuan Depreciation Imminent

September 3, 2015
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China in Recession; Yuan Depreciation Imminent

China is at the end-game of its great economic transformation. Multiple iterations of 5-year plans, and flawed central economic planning, created a massive build-up in debt that can no longer be continued. China’s debt fueled growth is understood, but the impact of the deleveraging phase is becoming evident in real time. Various estimates of China debt exist, but given the proliferation of shadow banking, and state involvement in the corporate sector, China’s total debt is a nebulous subject. Using estimates, China debt rose from $1 trillion in 2001 to $30 trillion today. China GDP is approximately 10x larger during a period in which debt rose 30x. McKinsey Global Institute estimates China debt-GDP at 282% in 2014. China’s economic problem is straightforward. Party rulers believed steadfast in the ability to...

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Market Treads Water

August 17, 2015
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Market Treads Water

After a one year hiatus (CJF writing hiatus), the US equity market remains resilient, hovering around 2,100, in a historically tight range for the past 9-months. The 20-day, 50-day, 100-day, and now 200-day, moving averages are converging, because again, the market is flat. A few observations to re-engage investment dialogue on this blog… At risk of a truism, sideways markets always resolve in one of two ways: a breakout to the upside or downside. CJF points this out because investors should not be lulled by extreme sideways action, nor should investors underestimate the possibility of a significant move in either direction. The current sideways market is manic, with a rotating focus on different exogenous factors, some of which have an inflated perception of ultimate impact. Market negatives and positives...

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Alcoa (AA); well positioned and stock worth revisiting

April 7, 2014
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Alcoa (AA); well positioned and stock worth revisiting

Alcoa (AA) just hasn’t received respect over the past several years. This is in the process of changing today, and AA has the potential to continue its rally to the low $20s from $12-$13. AA morphed into a classic out-of –favor stock since the financial crisis but lackluster stock performance created value amidst horrible sentiment. The stock moved sharply over the past 6-months, rising from $8 (where it traded give or take for 5-years) to $12. Alcoa reached $40 pre-financial crisis and the shares were never permanently impaired by a meaningful amount of distressed equity issuance – one crude measure to demonstrate upside. Pre-crisis, times were different, with a more consistent appetite for commodity exposures in an environment of rising commodity prices. Contrast to recent developments: Commodity exposures have...

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Heinz – An Emerging Market Food Leader

May 29, 2012
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Heinz – An Emerging Market Food Leader

Heinz (HNZ) had an Analyst Day on Thursday last week with about four hours of management presentations and Q&A posted on the investor relations section of the Heinz website. This presentation is a wonderful way to understand the Heinz business model and appreciate the strategic vision of the company. Heinz stock had a relatively strong run hitting new all-time highs around $55. Post-results, the shares have pulled back based on fears relating to the extent of reinvestment into restructuring projects, weakness in the frozen entrée category, exposure to Europe, and a near-term reduction in sales expectations as the company is being hit by foreign exchange and focusing on some low hanging fruit margin opportunities. Despite the concerns, Heinz is very well positioned strategically with a number of positives within...

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Welcome to the World, North Korea – Investment Opportunities Will Eventually Sprout

March 13, 2012
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Welcome to the World, North Korea – Investment Opportunities Will Eventually Sprout

North Korea has been isolated since the disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991. Significant amounts of communist aid ceased, and the fall of communism across Eastern Europe ultimately had a profound impact on the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea for the next two decades. North Korea was figuratively and literally off the grid as the country experienced severe shortages of electricity, energy, and food for many years. Society was more advanced around the time of Mao Zedong’s death in 1976 compared to today and the economy was much more productive. North Korea has been one of the few industrialized civilizations to experience famine during peacetime over the past 50 years. The state controlled media ranks second to last in terms of the World Press Freedom Index (if you’re...

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The Economic Process of Deleveraging Part One – What Happened in Japan?

February 9, 2012
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The Economic Process of Deleveraging Part One – What Happened in Japan?

The process of deleveraging has been in place since the onset of global recession and financial crisis in 2008. Many investors and economists have highlighted how long the process can take once it gets going. It’s striking how the theme of deleveraging, broadly speaking, is universally assumed to play out over a very long time. Japan is the oft cited example of how a deleveraging processes can take 20 years or more! It is all very alarming given that the western world’s recent crisis is only 2-3 years in. At risk of sounding Pollyannaish, there are dramatic differences between the economic situation in Japan in the late 1980’s and the US in 2008. For a number of reasons, I believe that a decade-long deleveraging process in the United States...

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Spain & Germany – In Sickness and in Health

January 4, 2012
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Spain & Germany – In Sickness and in Health

The plan forward with the Eurozone crisis is the German plan forward. Germany proposed closer fiscal union and increased austerity for EU-17 nations with high deficits and/or high debt burdens. This path suits German interests well because there is little that needs to be changed. Unfortunately from Spain’s standpoint, the German path forward is not what Spain needs. This dynamic is highlighted with yesterday’s unemployment releases. Spain hit a 22.8% unemployment rate, which is an all-time high, while Germany released a 6.8% unemployment rate, which represents a new low since German reunification. It is clear that Spain needs dramatically lower interest rates relative to appropriate monetary policy set rates for Germany. It is also clear that Spain needs a drastically lower currency value relative to the currency value which...

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2012 Global Investment Themes and Predictions

January 3, 2012
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2012 Global Investment Themes and Predictions

In 2011, the stock market experienced some dramatic swings, heightened volatility, managed some months of tremendous strength and sickening weakness. After an exhausting ride, the S&P 500 index returned to precisely where it started. For those who appreciate extreme precision, the market was down on the year based on the second decimal point of the index. The S&P 500 started the year at 1,257.64 and officially closed at 1,257.60. That is about a third of a basis point down and the reason the final index return has been recorded as: (0.00%). Of course the actual return that investors received includes dividends, and on this measure the S&P 500 total return was 2.11%. After clarifying the details, the market essentially tread water for the year. We commence 2012 with much...

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Lack of Confidence – A Key Driver of Investment Returns in 2011 – An Opportunity and Risk for 2012

December 20, 2011
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Lack of Confidence – A Key Driver of Investment Returns in 2011 – An Opportunity and Risk for 2012

2011 has been a difficult year for most investors. Market sentiment oscillated throughout the year and generating returns has been exceedingly difficult to come by, let alone maintain. The world experienced at least three distinct crisis; Japanese nuclear disaster, Arab Spring, and Sovereign Debt contagion through Europe. All three of these events were enough to knock the market down for a spell but the global economy was resilient enough to keep growing. Growing global GDP created an environment where corporate earnings rose, achieving new highs on the year. S&P 500 earnings will come in at close to $97 in 2011, up from about $86.50 in 2010. Earnings will register double digit growth of around 12% while the S&P is down 4% ytd. It isn’t difficult to see that the...

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China Moves Towards Opening Domestic A-Share Equity Market and Hints of Policy Easing Continue

December 16, 2011
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China Moves Towards Opening Domestic A-Share Equity Market and Hints of Policy Easing Continue

China had an interesting announcement after the close of trading last night which entails opening up the mainland securities markets to Hong Kong investors. According to regulators, China National Radio reports the government is going to trial quota issuance to Hong Kong securities firms for mainland investment. Securities brokerages and fund management firms will be able to use Yuan proceeds raised in Hong Kong to invest in domestic securities markets. China is approving 20 billion Yuan for the initial trial of quota which will be investible up to 80% in fixed income markets and 20% in equity markets. There isn’t much information out at this stage, but opening the domestic market up to a wider array of investors is the first step towards opening the market in general. The...

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Investing Ahead of a European Recession

December 14, 2011
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Investing Ahead of a European Recession

Investing ahead of a recession is like a trip to the dentist for a filling when the Novocain isn’t quite right. You know you are in for some pain, but it’s unclear just how much, and how long it will last. Europe is accepting the German path forward, which will at a minimum, lead to plenty of pain for many countries. Spain, Portugal, Greece, Belgium, Italy, and France are all experiencing, or likely to experience, a recession. Forward looking indicators are declining, confidence is dashed, austerity being implemented, European financial assets down sharply, and interest rates higher. The ECB is taking a minimalist approach to fighting the recession and the 17 countries in the Eurozone have different agendas, interests, and policy aims. In the background of the economic recession, there...

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